Caring for your countertops

for all types of stone

Cleaning
The following products are approved for general cleaning of your countertops:
• Ammonia-free Windex glass cleaner
• Sprayway glass cleaner
• Mild soap and water
• Microfiber towels

Do not use:
• Any cleaner containing ammonia
• Any acidic cleaners
• Coarse sponges or Magic Eraser
• Cleaners with abrasives e.g. Comet, Bar Keepers Friend

General cleaning techniques include wiping down your countertops with mild soap and water with a microfiber towel followed by an approved glass cleaner to restore the shine.

Use of unapproved products and techniques may permanently damage your countertops. Ammonia-based cleaners will break down the seal and finish of your countertops and may weaken joints causing them too separate.

Stains
Do not try to fix any stains. This may void any product warranties. Contact us for more information about removing stains
• Coarse sponges or Magic Eraser
• Cleaners with abrasives e.g. Comet, Bar Keepers Friend,

General cleaning techniques include wiping down your countertops with mild soap and water with a microfiber towel followed by an approved glass cleaner to restore the shine.

Use of unapproved products and techniques may permanently damage your countertops. Ammonia-based cleaners will break down the seal and finish of your countertops and may weaken joints causing them too separate.

Stains
Do not try to fix any stains. This may void any product warranties. Contact us for more information about removing stains.

Quartz

Quartz

Stains
Engineered quartz has a non-porous surface resistant to stains. However, we recommend you blot up spills immediately. Use an approved adhesive remover to rub away tough stains. Take a wet rag or cloth and use a recommended cleaner. Pour the cleaner directly on the stain and let it stay there for 5 to 10 minutes before you wipe it off. Once you have wiped off the cleaner, you should wipe off the counter again using warm water. An alternative to cleaners is caramel because of its sticker-like qualities which will help in pulling off the gooey stains. If needed, take a wet rag with some isopropyl rubbing alcohol and rub the stain using the wet towel or cloth. Then wipe the counter again using just warm water. If you are not able to remove stains, feel free to contact us for more information.

Cleaning
Remove grease with degreasing agent safe to use on quartz and spray it generously on your quartz countertops. Make sure the spray does not have any bleach because this will damage your quartz countertops. If you are going to use disinfectant wipes they must also be free of bleach. Immediately rinse off the surface using a sponge or wet towel. Keep your  countertops clean by wiping them down regularly with mild soap and warm water and a sponge or soft cloth. Powders and "soft" creams may contain abrasives that will scratch and dull surfaces. Keep a plastic putty knife on hand to gently scrape off dried, solid food or dirt.

Protection
It's a good practice to use cutting boards instead of striking your countertops with a knife. Using hot pads and trivets is a must under hot pots and pans, curling irons, etc. Coasters, placemats, etc. will also protect your surfaces. Grit caught between a hard item and granite may scratch some countertops. Ensure a clean working surface and adequate protection for your stone surfaces.

Strength
This manmade stone is usually quite strong and chip-resistant. Do not sit or place very heavy items on countertops, especially cantilevered overhangs. Solid surface countertops are very hard, but not flexible. They do not have a plywood backing, so when too much weight is applied in one spot, it could cause a crack.

Granite

Granite

Sealing
Some granite needs to be sealed. If you place a small puddle of water on your granite countertops and it's absorbed within ten minutes and leaves a darkened area on the granite, wipe off the excess water, let the stone dry completely, and clean the entire surface. Then you can apply a quality impregnating sealer.

Stains
This stone is somewhat stain-resistant, but may be porous, depending on the selected stone. Lighter colors are generally more prone to stains than darker colors. Natural oils (butter, cooling oil, etc.) as well as mineral oils may be absorbed into the material. As a general rule, blot up spills immediately. If you are not able to remove stains, feel free to contact us for more information.

Cleaning
Among the various types of stone, granite typically requires the least amount of maintenance. Keep your granite countertops clean by wiping them down regularly with mild soap and warm water and a sponge or soft cloth. A good granite cleaner may also be used. Avoid the use of generic cleaning products including bleach, glass cleaners, and other degreasers. Especially avoid ammonia-based cleaners and vinegar. Common household cleaners that you buy at your local store may contain acids, alkalis, and other chemicals that will degrade a granite sealer leaving the stone more vulnerable to staining. Powders and "soft" creams contain abrasives that will scratch and dull surfaces. Some residues may build up on on granite and dull the shine of polished surfaces. Keep a plastic putty knife on hand to gently scrape off dried, solid food or dirt.

Protection
It's a good practice to use cutting boards instead of striking your countertops with a knife. Using hot pads and trivets is a good idea under hot pots and pans, curling irons, etc. Although granite is scratch-resistant, grit caught between a hard item and granite may scratch some surfaces. Ensure a clean working surface and adequate protection for your granite countertops.

Strength
This natural stone is usually quite strong but deep veining can be points of weakness. Do not sit or place very heave items on countertops, especially cantilevered overhangs. Solid surface countertops are very hard, but not flexible. They do not have a plywood backing, so when too much weight is applied in one spot, it could cause a crack.

Repairs
Granite can crack, chip and scratch, but may also be repairable. Granite is a natural material subject to variations in color, veining, and pattern. Fissures and pitting occur naturally and are not defects.

Quartzite

Quartzite

Care instructions coming soon.

Marble

Marble

Care instructions coming soon.

Porcelain

Porcelain

Care instructions coming soon.